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  • The Paradise Papers: revealing financial secrets of the world's wealthiest 1%

    Millions of leaked records highlight damning cases of tax abuse involving multinational companies, high level politicians and even royals.

    Millions of leaked records highlight damning cases of tax abuse involving multinational companies, high level politicians and even royals.

The leaked trove of documents, dubbed the Paradise Papers, contain 13.4-million records that highlight damning cases of tax abuse and questionable business practices involving multinational companies, high level politicians, celebrities, wealthy executives and even royals.

The data dates from 1950 to 2016 and includes emails and loan agreements from more than 25,000 entities in 180 countries. Included in the data are never-before-seen details of corporate registries in 19 countries infamous for ensuring high levels of secrecy – key nodes in the global shadow economy.

The leaks were obtained by German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung and shared with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and a network of more than 380 journalists in 67 countries including amaBhungane and Business Day in South Africa.



6 November 2017 Paradise Papers: SA names aplenty in massive new tax haven leak

8 November 2017 New leaked papers show tax avoidance by super rich

8 November 2017 Paradise Papers: how an island and Ireland aided Apple's megaprofits

8 November 2017 Paradise Papers: Nike’s tax burden so soft it hardly makes a swoosh

9 November 2017 The ships Glencore wanted to keep ‘hush hush’

9 November 2017 Exposed: The South Africans named in the Paradise Papers

9 November 2017 Paradise Papers: Ramaphosa’s Shanduka deal flop

9 November 2017 Paradise Papers: Spar blames the rand

9 November 2017 Paradise in Mauritius

9 November 2017 Dummies' guide to the Paradise Papers

9 November 2017 Mauritius the apple of Aspen’s eye

9 November 2017 Who exactly is Appleby?

13 November 2017 Tax haven Mauritius’ rise comes at the rest of Africa’s expense



The amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism produced this story. Like it? Be an amaB supporter and help us do more. Know more? Send us
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